Queens Promenade

As part of the Mini Holland investment in cycling in the outer London Boroughs, the Royal Borough of Kingston Upon Thames commissioned Atkins to revitalise the riverfront and deliver a 1.6km two way segregated cycle track and realm access improvements to the adjoining Queens Promenade riverfront.

The brief called on Atkins to deliver on the Mayor’s and TfLs manifesto to deliver healthy streets for all revitalisng the riverfront and connect into the wider network of proposed and existing cycle routes across the borough.

Queens Promenade runs parallel to the River Thames and was a wide vehicle dominated route into central Kingston that segregates surrounding residential areas and Kingston University from the Riverside Conservation Area of Queens Promenade fronting onto the River Thames. The Queens

Promenade runs parallel to and below the street level of Portsmouth Road and had poor access, high maintenance planting, dilapidated seating, failing walls, cracked footways and no focal points or celebration of the rich history of the promenade.

This landmark project was successfully delivered and officially opened on the 17th April 2017 by Val Shawcross the Vice Mayor of London (at the time).

Innovative solutions were required throughout with the use of narrow retaining walls to retain mature London Plane trees, access ramps and ergonomically designed terraced seating for all built into the landform, integrated SUDs drainage throughout, the use of drought tolerant permaculture planting, introduction of shared use spaces and shared use bus stops. These have been expanded upon in sections 8 and 9.

To take the design from concept through to implementation for all of the public realm areas particularly focused on the riverfront enhancements of Queens Promenade. The Atkins transport planning team led the design of the highway alterations, pedestrian crossings and junction alterations.

Kingston Upon Thames were an engaged client throughout the scheme and facilitated much of the consultation with Atkins actively involved. The project sponsors TfL provided regular design
review advice. Kier were the contractor we supervised during the construction works.

Portsmouth Road was the first of Kingston’s landmark cycling schemes delivered as part of the Mini Holland programme. It is a primary route into Kingston town centre and alleviates the reliance on vehicular traffic. The project highlights the historic significance of Queens Promenade and Hampton Court. It delivers on the Mayor’s manifesto to deliver healthy streets for all.

Queens Promenade has exceeded expectations in the transformation of the riverfront. Targets for cyclist numbers have been exceeded, sustainability credentials achieved and wide ranging public realm improvements realised.

The project has demonstrated the benefits of having a landscape architect lead the design integration of cycling with public realm improvements ensuring the riverfront has been opened up to all to enjoy and the cycle route successfully integrated with the character and setting of Kingston upon Thames.

- Landscape Architects led the design
- Revitalised river front
- Delivered on Mayor’s healthy streets agenda
- Created a strategic and sustainable transport route
- Opened up access for all to river front
- Innovative seating terraces, planting and integrated SUDs used

Overview

  • Project Name

    Queens Promenade

  • Location

    Kingston Upon Thames, London

  • Category

    Transport infrastructure

  • Landscape Architect

    Atkins Landscape and Urban Design

  • Client

    Royal Borough of Kingston Upon Thames

  • Brief

    As part of the Mini Holland investment in cycling in the outer London Boroughs, the Royal Borough of Kingston Upon Thames commissioned Atkins to revitalise the riverfront and deliver a 1.6km two way segregated cycle track and realm access improvements to the adjoining Queens Promenade riverfront. The brief called on Atkins to deliver on the Mayor’s and TfL's manifesto to deliver healthy streets for all revitalising the riverfront and connect into the wider network of proposed and existing cycle routes across the borough. Portsmouth Road runs parallel to the River Thames and was a wide vehicle dominated route into central Kingston that segregates surrounding residential areas and Kingston University from the Riverside Conservation Area of Queens Promenade fronting onto the River Thames. The Queens Promenade runs parallel to and below the street level of Portsmouth Road and had poor access, high maintenance planting, dilapidated seating, failing walls, cracked footways and no focal points or celebration of the rich history of the promenade.

  • Awards

    Finalist, Landscape Institute Awards 2019

Details

  • Project Team

    Client: Kingston Upon Thames Project Sponsor: TfL Landscape Architect, Highway Design, Structural Engineers: Atkins Contractor: Kier

  • Local planning authority or government body

    Kingston upon Thames London Borough Council

  • Year Completed

    2018

  • Project Size

    4.8 ha

  • Contract Value

    £2.5 million

  • Atkins Landscape and Urban Design

    Registered Practice Membership
  • Approximate Map Location

    Location

    Kingston Upon Thames, London

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